Low Impact Development (LID)

Low Impact Development (LID) is a stormwater management and land development strategy applied at the road right-of-way, site plan and subdivision scale. This strategy emphasizes conservation and use of on-site natural features, integrated with engineered, small-scale hydrologic controls to more closely mimic pre-development hydrology. The goal of LID is to prevent measurable harm to streams, lakes, wetlands and other natural aquatic systems from commercial, residential or industrial sites. LID technologies and related design practices are used by GREENLAND® clients (wherever feasible from a functional perspective) for municipal infrastructure and land development projects.

Our LID planning and design strategy (by our engineering and landscape architecture teams) can include:

  • Green roofs;
  • Rainwater gardens;
  • Rainwater harvesting systems;
  • Permeable pavement structures
  • Bio-swales;
  • Artificial floating islands; and,
  • Other innovative ‘smart systems’ developed from the principles of bio-mimicry.

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Client Testimonials

Landrex

Landrex is currently working with Greenland and business partner, Clearflow Group, to develop strategies to improve the functionality of stormwater management facilities in Landrex's (ie the City's) existing and future communities in North St. Albert, namely within the Erin Ridge North neighbourhood.

Landrex has been impressed with the collaborative and innovative approach that Clearflow and Greenland provide; they are a solutions-based group that are tremendously attentive, responsive and client focused. We believe they would be an extremely valued partner to the City of Saint Albert and represent the qualified, licensed, and professional consulting firm that the City so seeks.

Jim Sheasgreen, P. Eng.
President
Landrex Inc.

May 15, 2018
 

Credit Valley Conservation

I wanted to take this opportunity to thank you for your work on the Brampton “Pond 10 Floating Islands Research Project”. This project was a “first of its kind” within our watershed.

Greenland was responsible for preparing the design brief for the islands that provided details on the anchoring system design, safety considerations and a strategy for establishing a vegetation community among other things. This was a challenging project given that there was no pre-established process to follow and therefore we were defining the design and implementation process from scratch.

Greenland was always very responsive when issues arose and helped us troubleshoot options to solve the issue. They refined the design brief and assisted CVC with implementing improved anchor designs that have been successful in keeping the islands stable over the past few years even though some extreme weather events.

We were very pleased with the consulting services Greenland provided for this project.

Phil James, P.Eng.
Manager, Watershed Protection and Restoration
Credit Valley Conservation

March 14, 2014
 

University of Guelph

The reappearance of excessive nutrient loading in Lake Erie and the subsequent algae blooms is an extremely complex issue and is quite different in nature than the previous phosphorous loadings in the 1970s. Unlike the issue in the 1970s, there are far more sources adding nutrients to the late and these sources are diverse in nature ranging from rural to urban. In order to understand the nutrient loading, both in the temporal and spatial domains, more complex analytic and predictive tools are required in order to help policy make sound, science based, and defendable solutions.

The University of Guelph is uniquely positioned to help address the issues around Lake Erie with long standing core strengths in both the agricultural sector and the environmental field. In conjunction with our partner, Greenland Consulting Engineers, and their watershed evaluation tool (CANWETTM), we believe that we have the engineering and technology to extrapolate CANWETTM from the watershed level up to the lake basin level and provide decision-making support for the entire Lake Erie basin.

Hussein Abdullah, Ph.D., P. Eng.
Director, School of Engineering
University of Guelph

January, 26 2015
 

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